Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto

ENGAGE IN TEMPLE LIFE

Our Reform congregation is more than a group of individuals: our members feel like an extended family. We offer multi-generational educational and social programming; dynamic Hebrew and religious school; exciting activities for young families; social action programs that reach out to the larger community; vibrant and inclusive daily services, and equal participation for men and women.

Temple offers an excellent range of opportunities for every member — no matter what their age or stage — to build relationships and find their own unique place in the Temple community.

For some that means joining in our very participatory Shabbat services, which have many opportunities for lay involvement, including Torah text study brought to life in a way that’s relevant for today. For others, it means finding enrichment in volunteer committees, social action initiatives, or adult Jewish learning programs.

Families value our excellent schools and child and youth programs that are designed for kids from 18 months to high school and beyond.

What our members say...
I have been told that our founding rabbi, Jordan Pearlson z”l, used to say, “Jews invented the support group. It’s called the minyan.” Every day members stop at Temple Sinai to attend an early morning Shacharit or an evening Ma’ariv service. Each person has their own personal reason: some are saying kaddish for a loved one, others come for the community or for a moment of quiet meditation.

Imagine starting off each day with a group of people who will say hello as you walk through the door, pray with you and even share an early morning discussion. Or, after a long day at work stopping for a few minutes to reflect on a busy day, share a laugh with friends and leave feeling a sense of peace.

Our Shacharit (7.30 a.m.) and Ma’ariv (6.30 p.m.) prayer services provide each of us with the opportunity to lend support to one another and are led by wonderfully committed Temple lay leaders. We are truly fortunate that as a large congregation, we have the ability to easily support 10 adults required for a minyan.

Having been actively involved in Temple life over the past number of years, I have been asked to chair a Temple task force with respect to our Shacharit and Ma’ariv prayer services with the view to continuing to increase their attendance.

I have been told by many of our members who, while recognizing the importance of these services, assume that minyan attendance is being met on a regular basis. Unfortunately, this is not the case. As a result, our members must say Kaddish or celebrate important life cycle events without the support of a minyan .

What can we do together to help?
1. Each of us can set aside a couple of days a month to attend minyan services, in support of our fellow Temple members.
2. If you are saying kaddish for a loved one, bring a family member or friend for an even more meaningful experience.
3. Share the contents of this article with your family and friends, in case they did not have the opportunity to read it.

If you would like more information about including a life cycle (births, engagements, prayers for healing, yahrzeits) at a morning minyan, please contact the Temple office at 416.487.4161.

We hope to see you soon!

Jeff Nightingale

Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
2020-07-03T15:38:56-04:00

Jeff Nightingale

I have been told that our founding rabbi, Jordan Pearlson z”l, used to say, “Jews invented the support group. It’s called the minyan.” Every day members stop at Temple Sinai to attend an early morning Shacharit or an evening Ma’ariv service. Each person has their own personal reason: some are saying kaddish for a loved one, others come for the community or for a moment of quiet meditation. Imagine starting off each day with a group of people who will say hello as you walk through the door, pray with you and even share an early morning discussion. Or, after a long day at work stopping for a few minutes to reflect on a busy day, share a laugh with friends and leave feeling a sense of peace. Our Shacharit (7.30 a.m.) and Ma’ariv (6.30 p.m.) prayer services provide each of us with the opportunity to lend support to one another and are led by wonderfully committed Temple lay leaders. We are truly fortunate that as a large congregation, we have the ability to easily support 10 adults required for a minyan. Having been actively involved in Temple life over the past number of years, I have been asked to chair a Temple task force with respect to our Shacharit and Ma’ariv prayer services with the view to continuing to increase their attendance. I have been told by many of our members who, while recognizing the importance of these services, assume that minyan attendance is being met on a regular basis. Unfortunately, this is not the case. As a result, our members must say Kaddish or celebrate important life cycle events without the support of a minyan . What can we do together to help? 1. Each of us can set aside a couple of days a month to attend...
Having the opportunity to go out in the van was eye opening, but not in the way I expected it to be. What my eyes were opened to was a community of kind, polite individuals who — for whatever reason — are currently living on the streets. While feeling safe and in great professional hands, I was able to interact and learn from these people, and add to the support that Ve’ahavta offers them five nights a week. There wasn’t one person I met that night whose genuine gratitude I couldn’t feel. It was amazing to feel like I was helping fill a void in these people . . . whether it was by way of a warm cup of coffee, a meal, or a comforting conversation. I’m looking forward to going out in the van again soon.

Shane Feldman

Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
2020-07-03T15:54:47-04:00

Shane Feldman

Having the opportunity to go out in the van was eye opening, but not in the way I expected it to be. What my eyes were opened to was a community of kind, polite individuals who — for whatever reason — are currently living on the streets. While feeling safe and in great professional hands, I was able to interact and learn from these people, and add to the support that Ve’ahavta offers them five nights a week. There wasn’t one person I met that night whose genuine gratitude I couldn’t feel. It was amazing to feel like I was helping fill a void in these people . . . whether it was by way of a warm cup of coffee, a meal, or a comforting conversation. I’m looking forward to going out in the van again soon.
“Both of us find it difficult to put into words the overwhelming feeling of inclusion we have within Temple Sinai and its warm, generous and welcoming members. Rabbi Michael Dolgin and everyone at Shul have been major inspirations in our lives as a couple and, needless to say, we are so incredibly grateful for the spiritual influence provided for our two sons, Brett and Blake. Whether we attend regularly or infrequently, there is no doubt that we consider this Temple our home.”

Avi Ferdman & Gavin Posner

Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
2020-07-03T16:11:32-04:00

Avi Ferdman & Gavin Posner

“Both of us find it difficult to put into words the overwhelming feeling of inclusion we have within Temple Sinai and its warm, generous and welcoming members. Rabbi Michael Dolgin and everyone at Shul have been major inspirations in our lives as a couple and, needless to say, we are so incredibly grateful for the spiritual influence provided for our two sons, Brett and Blake. Whether we attend regularly or infrequently, there is no doubt that we consider this Temple our home.”
I have met many people who share the love of learning through literature and current events. Book club attendees, library users, co-committee members, and Temple staff all provide a rewarding and stimulating connection experience.

Saul Kaufman, Temple Sinai Reads

Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
2020-07-03T15:40:36-04:00

Saul Kaufman, Temple Sinai Reads

I have met many people who share the love of learning through literature and current events. Book club attendees, library users, co-committee members, and Temple staff all provide a rewarding and stimulating connection experience.
Last night was great! What an eye-opening experience. The night ended early as we gave out all the food/coffee by 9ish. Regardless, we met many people, had some great conversations and were all feeling very good about giving back to the community. Speaking for my son and myself, we both met and talked to several memorable people, some of which might make it into my son’s recount of his portion.

For me personally, we stopped on Richmond Street, just east of Yonge Street. There was a blue tarp and Lauren got out and took some food and a coffee to the person under the tarp. My wife and I have driven downtown for years and I’ve seen the tarp. While I was pretty sure there was someone under it, I pushed it out of my mind. This experience brought it to the forefront and I will not pass by again thinking about the people and without trying to help. I was also pleasantly surprised by the politeness and thankfulness of the people we met. As I said, it was a great evening and experience.

My son and I have already talked about going out again.

Thank you for this great opportunity.

A father and son who went out on the MRJH van

Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
2020-07-03T15:55:31-04:00

A father and son who went out on the MRJH van

Last night was great! What an eye-opening experience. The night ended early as we gave out all the food/coffee by 9ish. Regardless, we met many people, had some great conversations and were all feeling very good about giving back to the community. Speaking for my son and myself, we both met and talked to several memorable people, some of which might make it into my son’s recount of his portion. For me personally, we stopped on Richmond Street, just east of Yonge Street. There was a blue tarp and Lauren got out and took some food and a coffee to the person under the tarp. My wife and I have driven downtown for years and I’ve seen the tarp. While I was pretty sure there was someone under it, I pushed it out of my mind. This experience brought it to the forefront and I will not pass by again thinking about the people and without trying to help. I was also pleasantly surprised by the politeness and thankfulness of the people we met. As I said, it was a great evening and experience. My son and I have already talked about going out again. Thank you for this great opportunity.
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Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto