Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto

Worship

Welcome Home

In-Person Services at Sinai
 
As conditions improve, we look forward to welcoming you back home. While our virtual service options will still be available, we invite our members to join one of our many intimate, musical and participatory services in person.
 
Shacharit at 7.30 a.m.
Limited in-person shacharit services will be offered on Mondays and Thursdays.
 
Shabbat Mornings
If you’re coming Shabbat morning for either our 10.00 a.m. sanctuary service or Family Shabbat in the tent, consider joining us at 9.30 a.m. for an informal get-together and sing along in Stacey’s Garden by the rotunda steps. Singing while masked and outdoors is considered perfectly safe by the experts, and you’ll have a chance to sing some of your Temple favourites, led by Cantor Charles Osborne and members of the Temple Sinai musical ensemble.
 
Shabbat in the Sanctuary at 10.00 a.m.
Join us for our regular Shabbat morning service—the same service you have come to enjoy on Zoom is now live, too, for a limited number of pre-registered members.
 
Family Shabbat in the Tent at 10.00 a.m.
Families with children twelve years and under can enjoy fellowship, music and a message from one of our rabbis in our parking lot tent! Socially distanced, of course, but a great time to reconnect with Temple and friends in a relaxed atmosphere.
 
Register Online
  • Our numbers are limited, and pre-registration is required. 
  • Register for in-person services by logging in to the Member Portal
  • Click on the In-Person Registration tab and then on the date(s) you wish to attend. 
  • With your registration, you will receive an e-ticket that you will present at the door. 
  • Services will only be posted one week at a time.
  • For Monday morning minyan: Registration is required Friday at noon, on the week prior.
  • For Thursday morning minyan: Registration is required by Wednesday at noon, one day prior.
  • For the first Shabbat morning services: Registration is required by Friday at noon, one day prior.
To maintain a safe and healthy environment, we ask that you follow the health and safety policies below:
  • Please stay home if you experience any symptoms of illness, such as an above-normal temperature, headache, cough, congestion, fatigue, or loss of sense of taste or smell. And we urge you to contact us immediately if you are positively diagnosed with COVID-19 within fourteen days of entering our building.
  • A health screening questionnaire must be completed up to twenty-four hours before entry.
  • Attendees must be fully vaccinated for COVID-19 (at least two weeks from the final vaccine dose).
  • Temperature checks will be taken before entry, and we ask that all members sanitize their hands.
  • Masks are required for everyone attending services and programs at Temple Sinai. 
  • Designated and socially distanced seating will be assigned, and ushers will assist you to your seats upon entering the Sanctuary.
  • Before and after the service, please keep social interactions to a minimum. While we are excited to see you, this is a necessary safety precaution to help ensure we can continue to offer services in person.
If you have any questions about the registration process, please contact Fran at [email protected] or 416.487.4161. 
 
We look forward to welcoming our congregation home.
What our members say...
Our people have many and varied mitzvot, sacred responsibilities. One that colours many others is our responsibility to look hopefully to the future. A hope I have for our people and our community this year is that we have the courage to mix tradition with innovation. We should draw comfort and strength from our Judaism even while it challenges us and we dare to challenge it. We should seek to live in a wide Jewish world that starts with our inner circles and reaches out to all corners of the globe!

Rabbi Michael Dolgin

Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
2020-07-03T15:36:49-04:00

Rabbi Michael Dolgin

Our people have many and varied mitzvot, sacred responsibilities. One that colours many others is our responsibility to look hopefully to the future. A hope I have for our people and our community this year is that we have the courage to mix tradition with innovation. We should draw comfort and strength from our Judaism even while it challenges us and we dare to challenge it. We should seek to live in a wide Jewish world that starts with our inner circles and reaches out to all corners of the globe!
When I stood with the Torah in my arms, my shoulders draped in my late father’s tallit, I experienced an indescribable sense of pride, freedom and happiness. I am so thankful that I had the privilege of holding the Torah and dancing freely in this country, and that I will have the opportunity for further study at Temple. I truly love the experience of studying with the clergy!

Berta Banks

Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
2020-07-03T15:37:23-04:00

Berta Banks

When I stood with the Torah in my arms, my shoulders draped in my late father’s tallit, I experienced an indescribable sense of pride, freedom and happiness. I am so thankful that I had the privilege of holding the Torah and dancing freely in this country, and that I will have the opportunity for further study at Temple. I truly love the experience of studying with the clergy!
My grandparents joined Temple in 1957 to create an atmosphere of Judaism for their growing family, and it has done so for over 50 years. I have had so many wonderful experiences at Temple Sinai, from participating in youth group, to my bat mitzvah, confirmation and most recently, my wedding. Temple has always been the place that I can enjoy the festivals with my family and reconnect with my Jewish roots. I was so thrilled that my husband felt an immediate connection to Temple as well. With our new baby, we have now added a fourth generation to our Temple Sinai family.

Sarah Chris

Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
2020-07-03T15:38:02-04:00

Sarah Chris

My grandparents joined Temple in 1957 to create an atmosphere of Judaism for their growing family, and it has done so for over 50 years. I have had so many wonderful experiences at Temple Sinai, from participating in youth group, to my bat mitzvah, confirmation and most recently, my wedding. Temple has always been the place that I can enjoy the festivals with my family and reconnect with my Jewish roots. I was so thrilled that my husband felt an immediate connection to Temple as well. With our new baby, we have now added a fourth generation to our Temple Sinai family.
I have been told that our founding rabbi, Jordan Pearlson z”l, used to say, “Jews invented the support group. It’s called the minyan.” Every day members stop at Temple Sinai to attend an early morning Shacharit or an evening Ma’ariv service. Each person has their own personal reason: some are saying kaddish for a loved one, others come for the community or for a moment of quiet meditation.

Imagine starting off each day with a group of people who will say hello as you walk through the door, pray with you and even share an early morning discussion. Or, after a long day at work stopping for a few minutes to reflect on a busy day, share a laugh with friends and leave feeling a sense of peace.

Our Shacharit (7.30 a.m.) and Ma’ariv (6.30 p.m.) prayer services provide each of us with the opportunity to lend support to one another and are led by wonderfully committed Temple lay leaders. We are truly fortunate that as a large congregation, we have the ability to easily support 10 adults required for a minyan.

Having been actively involved in Temple life over the past number of years, I have been asked to chair a Temple task force with respect to our Shacharit and Ma’ariv prayer services with the view to continuing to increase their attendance.

I have been told by many of our members who, while recognizing the importance of these services, assume that minyan attendance is being met on a regular basis. Unfortunately, this is not the case. As a result, our members must say Kaddish or celebrate important life cycle events without the support of a minyan .

What can we do together to help?
1. Each of us can set aside a couple of days a month to attend minyan services, in support of our fellow Temple members.
2. If you are saying kaddish for a loved one, bring a family member or friend for an even more meaningful experience.
3. Share the contents of this article with your family and friends, in case they did not have the opportunity to read it.

If you would like more information about including a life cycle (births, engagements, prayers for healing, yahrzeits) at a morning minyan, please contact the Temple office at 416.487.4161.

We hope to see you soon!

Jeff Nightingale

Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
2020-07-03T15:38:56-04:00

Jeff Nightingale

I have been told that our founding rabbi, Jordan Pearlson z”l, used to say, “Jews invented the support group. It’s called the minyan.” Every day members stop at Temple Sinai to attend an early morning Shacharit or an evening Ma’ariv service. Each person has their own personal reason: some are saying kaddish for a loved one, others come for the community or for a moment of quiet meditation. Imagine starting off each day with a group of people who will say hello as you walk through the door, pray with you and even share an early morning discussion. Or, after a long day at work stopping for a few minutes to reflect on a busy day, share a laugh with friends and leave feeling a sense of peace. Our Shacharit (7.30 a.m.) and Ma’ariv (6.30 p.m.) prayer services provide each of us with the opportunity to lend support to one another and are led by wonderfully committed Temple lay leaders. We are truly fortunate that as a large congregation, we have the ability to easily support 10 adults required for a minyan. Having been actively involved in Temple life over the past number of years, I have been asked to chair a Temple task force with respect to our Shacharit and Ma’ariv prayer services with the view to continuing to increase their attendance. I have been told by many of our members who, while recognizing the importance of these services, assume that minyan attendance is being met on a regular basis. Unfortunately, this is not the case. As a result, our members must say Kaddish or celebrate important life cycle events without the support of a minyan . What can we do together to help? 1. Each of us can set aside a couple of days a month to attend...
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Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto