Youth and Family Engagement

A place to call home for families with children. We provide social, religious, and educational programs during which children and their parents can make lasting friendships and create happy Jewish memories in and out of Temple.

Whether connecting through school, events, trips or camp, we offer every youth the opportunity to live and learn traditional Jewish values. Starting in the Community Preschool and up to grade 12, we present engaging programs that include Hebrew instruction, bar/bat mitzvah preparation, youth groups that host fun-filled evenings and trips both to experience Judaism from around the world and strengthen connections with Israel.


What our members say...
My grandparents joined Temple in 1957 to create an atmosphere of Judaism for their growing family, and it has done so for over 50 years. I have had so many wonderful experiences at Temple Sinai, from participating in youth group, to my bat mitzvah, confirmation and most recently, my wedding. Temple has always been the place that I can enjoy the festivals with my family and reconnect with my Jewish roots. I was so thrilled that my husband felt an immediate connection to Temple as well. With our new baby, we have now added a fourth generation to our Temple Sinai family.

Sarah Chris

Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
2020-07-03T15:38:02-04:00

Sarah Chris

My grandparents joined Temple in 1957 to create an atmosphere of Judaism for their growing family, and it has done so for over 50 years. I have had so many wonderful experiences at Temple Sinai, from participating in youth group, to my bat mitzvah, confirmation and most recently, my wedding. Temple has always been the place that I can enjoy the festivals with my family and reconnect with my Jewish roots. I was so thrilled that my husband felt an immediate connection to Temple as well. With our new baby, we have now added a fourth generation to our Temple Sinai family.
The folks we met when we were out on the van were courteous, appreciative and thankful for the sandwiches, coffee and, most importantly, the conversation. It was a rewarding and eye opening experience for both my two teens and myself. We would do it again in a heartbeat.

Debby Feldman

Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
2020-07-03T15:54:19-04:00

Debby Feldman

The folks we met when we were out on the van were courteous, appreciative and thankful for the sandwiches, coffee and, most importantly, the conversation. It was a rewarding and eye opening experience for both my two teens and myself. We would do it again in a heartbeat.
To me, Temple Sinai has represented the place where many major life cycle events have taken place: baby namings, bar and bat mitzvahs, weddings . . . all defining moments in my life. I see it as a place that challenges my religious values. It is also a place where I have made great lifelong friends.

Berta Banks

Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
2020-07-03T16:10:55-04:00

Berta Banks

To me, Temple Sinai has represented the place where many major life cycle events have taken place: baby namings, bar and bat mitzvahs, weddings . . . all defining moments in my life. I see it as a place that challenges my religious values. It is also a place where I have made great lifelong friends.
I have been told that our founding rabbi, Jordan Pearlson z”l, used to say, “Jews invented the support group. It’s called the minyan.” Every day members stop at Temple Sinai to attend an early morning Shacharit or an evening Ma’ariv service. Each person has their own personal reason: some are saying kaddish for a loved one, others come for the community or for a moment of quiet meditation.

Imagine starting off each day with a group of people who will say hello as you walk through the door, pray with you and even share an early morning discussion. Or, after a long day at work stopping for a few minutes to reflect on a busy day, share a laugh with friends and leave feeling a sense of peace.

Our Shacharit (7.30 a.m.) and Ma’ariv (6.30 p.m.) prayer services provide each of us with the opportunity to lend support to one another and are led by wonderfully committed Temple lay leaders. We are truly fortunate that as a large congregation, we have the ability to easily support 10 adults required for a minyan.

Having been actively involved in Temple life over the past number of years, I have been asked to chair a Temple task force with respect to our Shacharit and Ma’ariv prayer services with the view to continuing to increase their attendance.

I have been told by many of our members who, while recognizing the importance of these services, assume that minyan attendance is being met on a regular basis. Unfortunately, this is not the case. As a result, our members must say Kaddish or celebrate important life cycle events without the support of a minyan .

What can we do together to help?
1. Each of us can set aside a couple of days a month to attend minyan services, in support of our fellow Temple members.
2. If you are saying kaddish for a loved one, bring a family member or friend for an even more meaningful experience.
3. Share the contents of this article with your family and friends, in case they did not have the opportunity to read it.

If you would like more information about including a life cycle (births, engagements, prayers for healing, yahrzeits) at a morning minyan, please contact the Temple office at 416.487.4161.

We hope to see you soon!

Jeff Nightingale

Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
2020-07-03T15:38:56-04:00

Jeff Nightingale

I have been told that our founding rabbi, Jordan Pearlson z”l, used to say, “Jews invented the support group. It’s called the minyan.” Every day members stop at Temple Sinai to attend an early morning Shacharit or an evening Ma’ariv service. Each person has their own personal reason: some are saying kaddish for a loved one, others come for the community or for a moment of quiet meditation. Imagine starting off each day with a group of people who will say hello as you walk through the door, pray with you and even share an early morning discussion. Or, after a long day at work stopping for a few minutes to reflect on a busy day, share a laugh with friends and leave feeling a sense of peace. Our Shacharit (7.30 a.m.) and Ma’ariv (6.30 p.m.) prayer services provide each of us with the opportunity to lend support to one another and are led by wonderfully committed Temple lay leaders. We are truly fortunate that as a large congregation, we have the ability to easily support 10 adults required for a minyan. Having been actively involved in Temple life over the past number of years, I have been asked to chair a Temple task force with respect to our Shacharit and Ma’ariv prayer services with the view to continuing to increase their attendance. I have been told by many of our members who, while recognizing the importance of these services, assume that minyan attendance is being met on a regular basis. Unfortunately, this is not the case. As a result, our members must say Kaddish or celebrate important life cycle events without the support of a minyan . What can we do together to help? 1. Each of us can set aside a couple of days a month to attend...
Having the opportunity to go out in the van was eye opening, but not in the way I expected it to be. What my eyes were opened to was a community of kind, polite individuals who — for whatever reason — are currently living on the streets. While feeling safe and in great professional hands, I was able to interact and learn from these people, and add to the support that Ve’ahavta offers them five nights a week. There wasn’t one person I met that night whose genuine gratitude I couldn’t feel. It was amazing to feel like I was helping fill a void in these people . . . whether it was by way of a warm cup of coffee, a meal, or a comforting conversation. I’m looking forward to going out in the van again soon.

Shane Feldman

Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
2020-07-03T15:54:47-04:00

Shane Feldman

Having the opportunity to go out in the van was eye opening, but not in the way I expected it to be. What my eyes were opened to was a community of kind, polite individuals who — for whatever reason — are currently living on the streets. While feeling safe and in great professional hands, I was able to interact and learn from these people, and add to the support that Ve’ahavta offers them five nights a week. There wasn’t one person I met that night whose genuine gratitude I couldn’t feel. It was amazing to feel like I was helping fill a void in these people . . . whether it was by way of a warm cup of coffee, a meal, or a comforting conversation. I’m looking forward to going out in the van again soon.
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Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto